Friends of Falmouth Dogs - Celebrating 20 Years in 2010.
 
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Monday: 4:00-6:00
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Thursday:
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Animal Control Center
150 Blacksmith Shop Rd.
Falmouth, MA

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P.O. Box 438
Falmouth, MA 02541

phone number
508-548-7742
 

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Recent Falmouth Enterprise Columns


September 6, 2019
August 30, 2019
August 16, 2019
August 9, 2019

 

Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Kara Altshuler

Friday, September 6, 2019

Jackson, male, mixed breed

This week it's time to introduce Jackson—our handsome, young (less than 2 years old), mixed breed ball of activity. Jackson spent last week settling into his foster home and adjusting to life with another dog in the house and a big, fenced-in yard to play in.

On first glance Jackson appears to be a big goofball, all gangly legs and floppy ears. But this guy settles quickly and then starts to lean against you—and that's when it happens. You look into those big, brown eyes, he gives your face a lick, and boom—you're hooked. Jackson was regretfully surrendered by a family who couldn't keep him due to housing issues.

He is crate trained and house trained, and is quickly learning basic commands...he already knows "Sit" and "Down," and now we're just working on duration. He's learning to wait at doorways, and he's quickly learning leash manners. He really enjoys playing with other dogs (especially tug-of-war), and he loves snuggle time with his humans. He lived with children in his former home, so families would be great with Jackson. He is a pretty big guy, so families with children should be cognizant that he might inadvertently knock a toddler over. We also think a house with another dog would be just fine, given the proper introductions.

Regan, male, pugle

Although we don't require a fenced-in yard, we think having one would be a definite plus. We don't recommend cats, as Jackson's a bit too interested in them. If you want a dog who's probably up for anything activity-wise, call and let us know. Jackson is in foster care and can be seen by appointment.

UPDATE: Regan has been adopted!
Regan, our 6-year-old puggle, loves being a foster dog, what with all the attention he gets. This guy isn't serious about many things, but he is serious about his play. He loves a long game of fetch, and then when that is through, he's content to lie down at your feet and chew on a favorite toy—something strong and sturdy, of course.

Jada, female, terrier mix

He is a champion walker—no slow, ambling pace for this fellow! He lights up when he's around children, but he would prefer to be the only dog in the family. He's not super with cats, but he does learn to leave them alone. He is very affectionate and gives lots of kisses. He likes nap time, especially if he can sleep on his human's lap! If Regan sounds like your cup of tea, please call the shelter to arrange a meet-and-greet.

Jada is a young (less than 2 years old) terrier mix who is a sweet, smart, eager-to-please beauty. This girl is a real love bug. She loves to play ball or with her favorite stuffed snake, she loves food, she loves treats, she loves children, she loves adults, she loves other dogs. She loves walks, she loves car rides, she loves to snuggle, she loves belly rubs. Are you getting the picture? We haven't found much that she doesn't love. We haven't tested her with cats yet, though.

Jada is pretty close to perfect in our eyes, and we don't use that term lightly. See if you don't agree; Jada can be seen at the shelter during open hours.

Foster, male, standard poodle

UPDATE: Foster has been adopted!
Foster is a regal black beauty—an 8-year-old standard poodle. He has come a long way in the two weeks we've been taking care of him. His separation anxiety has improved, and recently we've had him playing in the exercise area with Jada.

We're finding out that Foster is just an all-around great dog. He rides beautifully in the car and is a perfect gentleman at the vet. He walks very well on leash, but he isn't trained in basic commands. We've been working on the "sit" command and waiting at thresholds. Foster has a reputation as an escape artist, as he loves to rush out of doors right behind you. His adopter will need to be vigilant about making sure that house doors and gates are securely latched, because he loves being outside and he hasn't been trained in off-leash recall.

At the end of a good walk, Foster will find a comfortable place to lie down at your feet to while away the evening. If Foster is your idea of the perfect companion, please drop by the shelter to see him.

The Black Dog, Falmouth, is hosting its Fall Adopt-A-Dog Event, Saturday, September 21, from 10 AM to noon. Please drop by to meet FFD volunteers, see posters of our available dogs, and maybe meet some friendly doggy alumni from years past! We'd love to see you.

FFD is at 150 Blacksmith Shop Road, Falmouth. We are open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 10 AM to noon; Monday and Thursday from 4 to 6 PM; and Sunday from 3 to 5 PM. We can be reached at 508-548-7742, or visit friendsoffalmouthdogs.org.

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Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Kara Altshuler

Friday, August 30, 2019

"Everybody should have a shelter dog. It's good for the soul."

    —Paul Shaffer
 

Although the astronomical dog days are over, here at FFD we are enjoying our own type of "dog days." We now have four fabulous dogs to enjoy, all of them good for the soul. We'll tell you about three this week—we're saving our latest canine companion for next week's article.

Regan, male, pugle

Regan, our 6-year-old puggle, is still in foster care, but we moved him to a different foster family, so he could be the only dog in the household. Regan prefers that, because he really doesn't like to share his toys with another dog. His new foster family has discovered how loving Regan is; he bonds quickly, is very affectionate, and loves to take naps on his foster dad's lap. He loves to take walks on leash, but he does have a tendency to bark at other dogs while out and about.

He should be the only dog in his forever home, but the good news is that a wide range of families would be ideal for Regan, including families with kids. Regan does exhibit separation anxiety, which will require some consistent attention to correct. But Regan is smart and learns quickly, so he should quickly pick up on what is expected of him.

If you're looking for a dog who loves to play fetch, who attaches quickly, and is smart and loving, then we invite you to call to make an appointment to see Regan.

Jada, female, terrier mix

Jada is a young (less than 2 years old) terrier mix who came to the shelter from a multiple-dog family. This big-eared beauty loves to meet other dogs and adores humans, young and old. Jada is very intelligent and came to us already knowing sit, stay, and how to give "paw." We have started working on other basic commands, and she is learning quickly.

She walks pretty well on leash, but we are refining her leash manners. She's a bit rambunctious due to her young age, but she is learning to keep four paws on the ground. She enjoys her training sessions, is food-motivated, takes treats with a soft mouth, and does not resource guard anything. She will be spayed this week and will be available as soon as she gets a clean bill of health from the veterinarian. We don't know how she is with cats yet, but she doesn't show a strong prey drive on walks, so she might be okay with cats, given a proper introduction. Jada is a special dog who captures hearts quickly. Come see if she won't capture yours, too!

Foster, male, standard poodle

Foster is our newest shelter resident. He is a beautiful, 8-year-old standard poodle—black, curly fur, with gentle brown eyes. He came to us when his owner became ill and unfortunately could no longer care for him.

Foster is accustomed to someone being home all the time, because he doesn't like being alone. He's quiet as a mouse when humans are with him, but he does bark when people are gone. Because he was an only dog for so long, he takes time to warm up to other dogs. So, a home where he can be the only dog is best for Foster. He walks well on leash, isn't bothered by bikers on the road, and doesn't appear to have a strong prey drive. He loves toys and gives kisses readily. We'll learn more about Foster over the next several days, but if you have a home where people are around most of the time and want a gentle, sweet dog who is easy to walk and play with, come meet Foster.

FFD is at 150 Blacksmith Shop Road, Falmouth. We are open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 10 AM to noon; Mondays and Thursdays from 4 to 6 PM; and Sundays from 3 to 5 PM. We can be reached at 508-548-7742, or visit our website at friendsoffalmouthdogs.org.

 

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Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Kara Altshuler

Friday, August 16, 2019

Now that it's the dog days of summer, many dog owners look to ponds and lakes as convenient places to let their dogs cool off. But, unfortunately, as the news suggests, this may pose a health risk for your dog. Four dogs in the Southeast (three in North Carolina, one in Georgia) have died due to liver failure, most likely from ingesting water contaminated with toxic blue-green algae. The algae, also known as cyanobacteria, grow quickly in water bodies due to photosynthesis, but in addition to releasing oxygen, they also release toxic compounds.

Although the dogs in the recent news reports all died in the same general area, algal blooms can occur during warm months in any freshwater body in the country. In addition, they can also arise in decorative ponds or backyard pools, so living in the Northeast does not make our dogs safer than dogs from the South.

One scientific study identified 368 cases of dog poisoning from hazardous algal blooms (HABs) across the United States. Although the cases occurred over a nine-decade period, researchers believe this may be a small fraction of the actual cases that occur, because dog owners often do not know the cause of their dog's declining health.

The US EPA recommends not letting your dog swim in any water that has a strange color, is murky, or has a strong odor. And if you think your dog has come into contact with an HAB after swimming in a pond or lake, get the dog rinsed off with fresh, potable water as quickly as possible and do not let the dog lick contaminated water off his fur.

Symptoms can arise as quickly as 15 minutes after exposure, and include vomiting or diarrhea, weakness/staggering, drooling and difficulty breathing, as well as convulsions or seizures. If you see symptoms this serious, please take your dog to his veterinarian immediately.

Regan, male, pugle

On a lighter note, we'd like to talk about Regan, our 6-year-old puggle, (pug-beagle cross) currently living in a local foster home. Regan is an energetic, fun-loving guy who has been having a great time with his foster mom and his foster brother, a German shepherd. The family cat is another matter entirely, but he is learning to give her space.

He plays fetch and loves to sit beside someone while chewing on a tennis ball. He even has a great parlor trick in which he carries two tennis balls in his mouth at the same time! He loves to play with sticks, too—the bigger the better. He bonds to his new humans very quickly, and he is very affectionate.

We are working on leash manners, as Regan tends to pull while walking. He can also be protective of his toys if other dogs are present, but he is quickly learning the "out" and "leave it" commands, which are useful not only for dealing with toys, but with other attractive nuisances (did we mention the cat?). He is neutered, up to date on vaccines, and house trained.

He is a smart, eager-to-please dog who would fit in with any family looking for an energetic companion. Another plus is he doesn't howl! He can be seen by appointment. If you think Regan is perfect for your active family, call us at 508-548-7742 to set up a time to meet him.

For the month of August, each time a $2.50 reusable GIVE BACK WHERE IT COUNTS Bag is purchased at the Shaw's in East Falmouth, Teaticket Highway, $1 will be donated to FFD, unless otherwise directed by the customer through the Giving Tag. This is a great way to raise awareness, support the environment and fundraise for our cause. To learn more about this program, visit shaws.bags4mycause.com.

FFD is at 150 Blacksmith Shop Road, Falmouth. We are open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 10 AM to noon, Monday and Thursday afternoons, 4 to 6 PM, and Sundays, 3 to 5 PM. We can be reached at 508-548-7742. Visit friendsoffalmouthdogs.org.

 

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Falmouth Enterprise Archived Column

By Kara Altshuler

Friday, August 9, 2019

Sometimes we get phone calls from dog owners who are concerned their dog is depressed. The owner will describe a mopey Moppet, who no longer shows the same level of interest in her favorite toy, delicious treat, or going for a walk. "What can I do for my dog?" the owner will ask. "Do dogs get depressed like humans?" According to Jessica Vogelsang, DVM (petmd.com) the answer is no; dogs don't suffer clinical depression like humans. But dogs can exhibit changes in behaviors that are most likely the result of an underlying physical condition.

For example, a lack of desire in playing fetch may result from achy joints in an aging dog, while lack of interest in food may be the result of stomach upset from the dog ingesting something she shouldn't have. Because medical conditions are so often the cause of behavioral changes in dogs, it is important to make a visit to the veterinarian your top priority if you notice changes you would classify as signs of depression. Some of these behaviors include:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Lack of interest in exercises such as walking
  • Increased aggression to people or other pets
  • Getting lost/disoriented around the home
  • Sleeping more than usual
  • Increased toileting accidents in the home

Major changes in family dynamics can also contribute to "depressive" behaviors. Dogs can also be very sensitive to changes in their surroundings and their routine, and even minor changes can put them out of sorts, so don't discount even the smallest change. Once a mopey dog has gotten a clean bill of health from her vet, a plan can be developed to get the dog back to her happy self. Often that just requires extra attention and support from her owners.

Regan, male, pugle

Well, we at FFD are certainly very happy to report that Luna and Pixey were both adopted last week. Those lucky ladies are now enjoying the time of their lives in their new homes. We have a new dog to talk about this week. Meet Regan, a 6-year-old puggle (pug-beagle cross) who is currently in foster care. Regan came from a home with kids, and we have found that he plays well with dogs of all ages. He is very sweet, but has lots of energy, so we think a family with kids and even another dog would be a great fit. We are working on leash manners, as Regan tends to pull on leash. But he already knows some basic commands and he's very smart and eager to please. He will be available starting tomorrow and can be seen by appointment. If you think Regan fits your idea of a fun time, please call us at 508-548-7742 to set up a time to meet him.

We are also happy to share that Friends of Falmouth Dogs (FFD) has been selected to be a part of the Shaw's GIVE BACK WHERE IT COUNTS Reusable Bag Program, which is designed to make it easy for customers to contribute to their local community while supporting the environment.

For the month of August, each time a $2.50 reusable GIVE BACK WHERE IT COUNTS Bag is purchased at the Shaw's in East Falmouth, on Teaticket Highway, $1 will be donated to FFD, unless otherwise directed by the customer through the Giving Tag. This is a great way to raise awareness, support the environment and fundraise for our cause.

To learn more about this program, visit shaws.bags4mycause.com.

FFD is at 150 Blacksmith Shop Road, Falmouth. We are open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 10 AM to noon, Monday and Thursday afternoons, 4 to 6 PM, and Sundays, 3 to 5 PM. We can be reached at 508-548-7742. Visit friendsoffalmouthdogs.org.

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